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Excerpted from "Social Security Handbook". See the up-to-date, official Social Security Handbook at ssa.gov.

Rounding of Benefit Rates

738. Rounding of Benefit Rates

738.1 Are benefit rates rounded?

Yes. Benefit rates must be rounded.

738.2 How are benefit rates rounded?

Calculations that are not a multiple of 10 cents are rounded to the next lower multiple of 10 cents. For example, $100.18 is rounded down to $100.10.

The monthly amount payable is rounded to the next lower multiple of $1 if it is not already a multiple of $1. For example, $100.70 is rounded down to $100.

If you are entitled to Medicare, the Part B premium is deducted before rounding the monthly benefit payable to the lower multiple of $1.

Last Revised: Oct. 31, 2003


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Comments

ss computer hearing disabled could not understand

June 3, 2011 by Guest

waisted 4 calls to ss computer (she) could not understand a plainly enuciated last name then cancleled my call. computer did not refer me to a living operater. just said call back . wetried 4 times same problem. Pathetic!!!!!!!!! we must drive to office to get a simple letter of benefits which LA city demands not accepting the S>S> statment given for income tax report.

Online request for Social Security Proof of Income Letter

June 5, 2011 by David Luhman

I'm not sure what type of letter you're looking for. However, if you're looking for a "Proof of Income Letter" you can request it online at http://www.ssa.gov/beve

You can submit a complaint here :

http://ssa-custhelp.ssa.gov/app/ask_feedback/

dual benefits for child

February 20, 2013 by Guest

i am on ssd. i am a single mom. my child receives auxiliary benefits on my record. my ssd and hers were used in child support court as earned income and reduced the amount of child support he had to pay.

living as two seperate families in two seperate houses, her dad dies. he worked paid ss etc... and now she has been denied her survivor benefits for she recieve a benefit on my record ( I too paid my ss "dues" when I worked!) her dad had no other children and was never married.

Now it appears we are out 340 dollars a month and her survivors benefits are free for the federal gov. to keep! I feel this is wrong and it's shady. we lived as poverty by our federal gov standards before he died and now it's even worse.

I feel sorry for my child having to do with out and having to have her mom all stressed out over money all the time. this is wrong to deny a minor child survivors benefits as long as the parent paid in the minor child should be able to get from BOTH parents record equally. just another way to lower the already poor for more control.

any help with suggestion would be great email itsmehurricaneb AT hotmail.com

Disability, survivor, and child benefits

February 20, 2013 by David Luhman

It sounds like you're receiving "normal" Social Security Disability (not SSI), and your child is receiving dependent benefits based on your work (disability) record.

http://www.ssa.gov/dibplan/dfamily4.htm

Normally, it's likely that your child would qualify for survivor benefits. However, in general for Social Security benefits, one can receive the HIGHER of two possible benefits, but not both.

http://ssa-custhelp.ssa.gov/app/answers/detail/a_id/175

You still may want to look into an appeal.

http://www.ssa.gov/pubs/10041.html

survivors benefits need help with

September 6, 2013 by Guest

thank you for providing the info above, however, all of this has been researched. I don't want to hire an attorney for It would not be right for this childs entitlement benefits have to be used for one. this is how I see it
This child has been deemed by Social Security to be “Entitled” to these survivors benefits, however, the Entitlement she is given is “technically entitled” due to “dual entitlement”. This minor dependent child does NOT have dual entitlement within a family. This minor dependent child is being denied of actually receiving these survivors benefits due to the fact her mother of her own separate family is a disabled person herself.
Below is copied from: http://www.socialsecurity.gov/policy/docs/ssb/v71n1/v71n1p1.html
. Using SIPP methodology we define families as persons living in the same household and related by blood, marriage, or adoption.10 If only one parent or guardian is present in the family, we consider that person the family head;
In reguards to****. (the deceased)single Natural Father of this minor child Mr.****(. was the family head in his own family to which this child was a member of equal to and separate from that of her mother. Mr. **** in fact paid child support for this child

Ms.****natural disabled mother is indeed the family head within her own family to which this child is a member of of equal to and separate from that of her father.
therefore a child can be counted within 2 seperate families simuletaniously independently from one another.

Also this was copied from the POMS found at: www.ssa.gov
SSA sometimes issues favorable decisions to the same claimant in more than one type of claim for benefits (i.e., dual and/or simultaneous entitlement such as disability based on a claimant's social security number (SSN) and as a survivor on another's SSN).
The fact that Mr. ****is now deceased, does not change the need of the financial dependency that which supported the basic means of his minor dependent child. Meaning the financial obligation and support of which this minor child depended on did not end with his death.

copied from ssa.gov poms
When you start receiving disability benefits, certain members of your family also may qualify for benefits on your record. Benefits may be paid to your:
• spouse,
• divorced spouse,
• children,
• disabled child, and/or
• adult child disabled before age 22
If any of your qualified family members apply for benefits, we will ask for their Social Security numbers and their birth certificates.
If your spouse is applying for benefits, we also may ask for proof of marriage, and dates of prior marriages, if applicable.
Maximum Family Amount
Each family member may be eligible for a monthly benefit of up to 50 percent of your disability rate. However, there is a limit to the amount we can pay your family.
The total depends on your benefit amount and the number of family members who also qualify on your record. The total varies, but generally the total amount you and your family can receive is about 150 to 180 percent of your disability benefit.
If the sum of the benefits payable on your account is greater than the family limit, the benefits to the family members will be reduced proportionately. Your benefit will not be affected.
Note: If you have a divorced spouse who qualifies for benefits, it will not affect the amount of benefits you or your family may receive.
Where as “family” highlighted above ,I, ****, the mother of the minor child in this case do not apply. I “fit” no where in what is considered as a family member to Mr.** childs natural father nor am I a former family member.
It is like this child is being denied payment for 1) mother worked and paid into the ss 2)mother is disabled
This seems to be NOT right and against constitutional rights??!!! the fifth amendment I too have not been able to get ss to give me a letter with notice to be able to take it to a judge. ANY HELP is sure APPERCIATED hear. If she can't get this survivors benefit this needs to be repealed! Thanks

Child denied survivor benefits

September 6, 2013 by admin

I am unfamiliar of a case where survivor benefits are denied because the mother is disabled.

I know of at least three reasons why a child's survivor benefits may be eliminated or reduced :

1) The paternity of the child can not be determined to be the deceased person.

2) The child becomes and adult. Survivor benefits end after age 18, or at the end of the 12th grade, whichever occurs first (unless the child is disabled).

3) The child is in a larger group of children (three or more) so the "family limit" comes into play. This will "proportionally" reduce benefits, but not eliminate them.


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